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Introduce yourself to MalariaWorld members

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Bart G.J. Knols
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Introduce yourself to MalariaWorld members

We're a big community of more than 8000 members, and it would be nice if we could get to know each other better... So tell us:

Who you are, where you work, what you work on and why you consider this important...

I'll start to kick off the introductions....

Bart G.J. Knols
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Vector biologist...
Hello everyone. I'm Bart, a mosquito man by training, and I have spent 11 years of my life in East and Southern Africa researching tsetse flies and malaria mosquitoes. Now I'm back in The Netherlands, and as you know, working hard to make MalariaWorld a success... We aim to launch DengueWorld in the middle of this year... You can contact me any time with questions about MalariaWorld (see the about us page for details). I hope to one day move into an area somewhere on the planet and truly show that eradication of malaria or dengue is feasible using strategies of the past...
Tullu Bukhari
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Entomologist
Who: Tullu Bukhari Where: The Netherlands What: Larval control Why: becuause I see larval control as an inevitable approach for malaria eradication.
Ricardo Ataide
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Last year PhD Student/immunology
Hi, my name is Ricardo Ataide and I'm a portuguese PhD student. I'm enrolled at the GABBA program in Portugal (gabba.up.pt) and I'm performing my lab work at the Dept of Medicine of the University of Melbourne in Prof Stephen Rogerson's malaria Lab. I'm interested in the immune responses that women in their first pregnancies mount against the new parasite variant that binds to their placental tissue. My work focuses on monocytes and their interactions. This is important to understand what are the correct type of responses we want a vaccine to elicit and also to find ways to prevent or minimize the deleterious effects of placental malaria in these women and their offspring.

Ricardo Ataíde

Vivek Ravi Varma
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Hi Everybody
My name is Vivek... and I am involved in the manufacture of RDTs for Malaria. I am based in Daman, India. We already manufacture one of the best RDTs available for Malaria. My goal is in ensuring the latest technology is available for early diagnosis of Malaria. The technology should be viable and usable by anybody, anywhere.
Ameth Abdoulaye Sy
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Joined: 24 Jun 2010 - 13:07
Business contact
Dear Varma,* I am from Senegal and intrested on your product (tdr) Whitch brand it is ? Can we have your contact please. Best regards AMETH SY
Olufunmilayo Idowu
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Public Health Parasitologist
Hi everyone, my name is Funmi, I live and work in Nigeria, Africa. I have been exposed to several malaria infections from childhood . Now as a parasitologist my focus has been on the control of malaria and its limitation in Nigeria. I concluded my PhD study a couple of years ago which was an Epidemiological study of malaria in pregnancy in Nigeria. I am currently seeking for a postdoc opportunity in malaria epidemiology, control strategies or assessment of impact of various malaria control tools such as Longlasting Insecticide Treated Nets(LLITN )and Intermittent Preventive Treatment( IPT)or Indoor Residual Spray (IRS).
Ameth Abdoulaye Sy
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Business contact
Dear Bart The fight against malaria remain a challenge for all of us. GBTH"global business trading house" based in Dakar -Senegal. We are Bestnet Europe LTD representative in the west and central africa and the only distributor of the long lasting bed net "NETPROTECT". For more details do not hesitate to contact us. Best regards AMETH A SY SALES MANAGER Email: asy@soni.sn
William Jobin
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This is a summary of my public health experience and interests
About 50 years ago I started working as a public health engineer in the tropical Americas and Africa on engineering and environmental methods for control of malaria, Snail Fever (aka schistosomiasis) and other tropical diseases. Along the way I helped develop the final steps in control of Snail Fever in Puerto Rico, then went to central Sudan where I worked on malaria control as well. I have worked in 17 African countries, as well as several others in Arabia, Asia and the Americas. Also I have published a couple of books and about 50 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals. My first scientific article was published in Science in 1964 on Ecological design of irrigation canals for snail control, volume 145, number 3638, pages 1324-1326. My most recent article on malaria control in Angola was published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization. You can Google it at - doi:10.2471/BLT.08.052514. Having started with WHO in 1963 I've been on various WHO Expert Committees on tropical diseases since, and worked for them in Ghana, Pakistan, Yemen and other countries of their Eastern Mediterranean Region. Another of my main activities has been the conduct of health and environmental impact assessments on large water and energy projects in the tropics. I've worked on Akosombo Dam in Ghana, Manantali and Diama Dams in Senegal, Mauritania and Mali, on Merowe Dam in the Sudan, Bujagali Dam on the upper Nile in Uganda, Jubba River Dam in Somalia, and several small hydrolelectric dams in the Dominican Republic. In 2005 I was asked by USAID to start their first project in Angola under the new US Presidential Malaria Initiative. I was so upset by the bumbling approach I found there, and the lack of substance in the UN and WHO malaria programs in the Africa Region, that I was compelled to write "A realistic strategy for fighting malaria in Africa" to try to give them some guidelines for sustainable strategies in Africa. I have just published this as Blue Nile Monograph One with Boston Harbor Publishers, and have some hope that I can influence the people in Washington DC and Geneva to get their act in order. I am not sure, however. Your suggestions and help would be appreciated. As my parting shot, I think that eradication of malaria in Africa, and a practical vaccine against malaria in our lifetime, are fantasies and chimeras. But still hoping,

William Jobin Director of Blue Nile Associates

Sumodan P K
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I do agree
Yes, I agree with you. Sometimes I have a feeling that there are vested interests to see malaria is not eliminated. Still, let's be optimistic.

Dr. P.K. Sumodan

Assistant Professor of Zoology

Government College Madappally,

Kerala, India

Ingeborg van Schayk
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Mama MalariaWorld
<p>Hello, my name is Inga (full name = ingeborg van Schayk) and I am the founder of MalariaWorld. I am a social scientist specialized in adult education and communication and have worked 10+ years in malaria endemic countries, mostly Africa + some yrs in Latin America. I have experience in a broad range of organizations: community work, NGO's, internat. research organisations, ministry and UN. I have worked with all sorts of people such as street-youth, illiterates, maasai, women groups, trainers, ministers, policy-makers, scientists, bureaucrats etc. etc. The biggest challenge of all still is being a good wife and a mother of 2. I started what has become MalariaWorld in Western Kenya (2001) as part of a communications project of MIM, funded by the US National Library of Medicine. The aim was to centralize published malaria information and send that around in one e-mail so that everyone else could focus on their work rather than spending hrs and hrs searching for the same information. I am dedicated to make MalariaWorld the best information portal on malaria and I am proud of you and all our other subscribers who make this initiative a success. Currently I reside in The Netherlands where I am the Director of the Dutch Malaria Foundation the charity organisation behind MalariaWorld. Read more about me on&nbsp;<a href="http://nl.linkedin.com/in/ingeborgvanschayk" target="_blank">nl.linkedin.com/in/ingeborgvanschayk</a></p>
Dr Osita Okonkwo (not verified)
Dear Inga, Just want to say a
Dear Inga, Just want to say a Big thank you for giving a voice to Malaria across the globe. You stand out as a role model for most of us, and would continue to motivate many to greatness. You are an Icon indeed! Sincerely, Osita
Olajoju Soniran
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Well done
Dear Dr Ingeborg v S. I am delighted to read about you especially your aim of establishing MalariaWorld. I am currently a PhD student in Nigeria working on drug resistant malaria parasites. I have benefited greatly from published malaria information made public through your platform. I want to say 'well done' and more grease to your elbow. I believe many scientists have found this platfom useful as the number of subscribers continue to increase. I hope to contribute my quota towards the fight against this disease that kills millions annually. Once again 'well done'
mohamed adan
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hi
I am Adan, a research lab technologist working with KEMRI/WELLCOME TRUST in kilifi,kenya.
Rahul Gosavi
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About malaria
Hello Everyone, I'm Rahul and doing my Phd in Malaria vaccine in Haffkine Institute, Mumbai. I would like to share with u all about the new findings in malaria all over the world. So trying to keep in contact with everyone.. thanking you..
Willem van Prooijen
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My introduction
Dear Malariaworld subscribers. My name is Willem van Prooijen. I have a company named MeduProf-S (Sustainable Medical Education for Professionals) We have training projects/programs all over Africa, Middle East and the Carribean. Since 15 years I am active in the following countries: Kenya, Malawi, Tanzania, Ghana, Zambia, Uganda, Mozambique, Egypt, Yemen, Libya, Bonaire, China and South Africa. Three reasons to be interested in Malariaword: In our involvement in African Hospitals we face the impact Malaria has on the mortality rate. We are surprised by the practical approach of Malariaworld and we are ready to support Malariaworld through our network with prevention and training in the future. Sending our own staff mainly to Malaria areas we are confronted with the danger of the disease ourselves. That is why I decided to be a boardmember of the Dutch Malaria Foundation.

Willem van Prooijen, MeduProf-S P.O. Box 347 5600AH Eindhoven The Netherlands willem.van.prooijen@meduprof-s.com +31650242148

Ideas on Cameroon
I am happy to read about the initiative you and your colleagues are doing in Africa. My reasons for writing are thus; what areas of training is meduprof-s providing within Africa, and were there specific reasons for choosing the afrorementioned countries and leave out the likes of Cameroon etc. Does your organisation hold seminars on malaria and how best can Clinique Veritas (though in its development stage) help promote your course in addition to that of malariaworld. As a not-for profit company our main aim is to aid in the reduction of infectious diseases fatalities (infant especially) by promoting rapid diagnostic solutions and education in urban and rural regions. bpufong@cliniqueveritas.com
Advancing diagnosis in Cameroon
My name is Boris Pufong and I am the founder of clinique veritas (www.cliniqueveritas.com), a supplier and distributor of rapid tests and point of care test poducts in Cameroon, and the west and central African region. After studying Pharmacology and obtaining a masters in Immunoloy, I pursued an MBA at Manchester Business School UK, I have worked with various global biotechnology firms and pharmaceutical companies including GSK in the UK. I realised in Cameroon and most African countries, there is large ratio of patient to doctor (1:40,000 in Cameroon) which could result in slow disgnosis. Having rapid tests and point of care test products (which deliver results in minutes) in these markets would not only speed up diagnosis and free up resources but will also enhance communication between patients and doctors as well as speed up treatment. Clinique Veritas, also holds educative seminars in these countries and place doctors in hospitals where there can advance their knowledge of infectious diseases and be contributory in promoting excellence in healthcare in Africa. Our products cover a wide range of diagnosis for diseases predominant in the aforementioned region. These include, malaria, cholera, typhoid, diabetes, HIV, to name a few.
Cliff Landesman
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Donor in New York City
I am relatively new to malaria and certainly to Malaria World. I have been an individual donor to international development organizations for about 30 years. My engagement during that time was rather similar to the approach advocated by GivingWhatWeCan.org. I am exploring a different approach to philanthropy by focusing on a specific problem and a defined region. My interest now is in malaria in western Kenya. I am experimenting with an alternative form of philanthropy that is more active and participatory. In particular, I have been exploring what can be accomplished through North/South dyadic partnerships. I have found a partner in western Kenya, someone who lives in a town not far from areas of endemic malaria. We communicate by email and phone. Together, we are trying to learn as much as we can about the effort to provide universal bed net coverage in our area of western Kenya. We will attempt to support and supplement those efforts as creatively and usefully as possible.. By exposing myself to direct feedback, especially from individuals who live in western Kenya, I believe that over time I will acquire a more sophisticated appreciation for the challenges of fighting malaria, at least in this particular area of the world. I am skeptical about the goal of some organizations (such as Malaria No More) to eliminate deaths from malaria worldwide by 2015. Is that really feasible? However, I think by working with a few others in a collective effort, we might have a chance of eliminating deaths from malaria in one small region of western Kenya. If not, at least I will know more about the region and what doesn't work than if I was simply a donor to an anti-malaria organization. I already feel a much closer connection to this area of western Kenya than I did to any other region of the world during the 30 years that I was a donor and only a donor to nonprofit organizations. Cliff
William Jobin
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Bednets can be supplemented with housing improvements
Hi Cliff, I really like your new approach to supporting malaria control, in western Kenya. And I share your skepticism about zero deaths in 2015, we need to bite off more reasonable sized goals, like substantial decreases in the number of deaths. Having lived, travelled and camped out in Africa for about 50 years, I want to make a suggestion about your bednet program. At certain times of year, especially when it is hot and humid, bednets become an aggravation. They block the flow of cooling breezes at night. In Sudan where I lived for 5 years, people would simply go outside in the yard and sleep under the stars during those humid nights. Of course that is just what our friend the mosquito is looking for. So, looking for ways to increase air circulation is something to think about, if you want folks to stay under the bednets. You might cut additional 'window' openings at bed level in sleeping rooms. But that depends very much on local housing construction. Another way to handle this is to mosquito-proof the sleeping areas, so that bednets are not needed on the individual level. Again this depends on local housing construction. I think our venerable leader Bart Knols sponsored a blog a few years ago on improved architecture in malaria areas. You might get some ideas from him, too. Best wishes for your project in Kenya. When you say Western Kenya, is that near Lake Victoria? Bill

William Jobin Director of Blue Nile Associates

Cliff Landesman
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bed nets vs screening homes
<p>Hi Bill,</p><p>I reread your post from June 9, 2011. It has now been over a year since we first communicated. As a result of reading your monograph and our communication, I have switched from focusing on bed nets to focusing on indoor screening. As you probably know, I have started a blog about malaria in western Kenya: <a href="http://malariakenya.blogspot.com">malariakenya.blogspot.com</a>. It will be interesting to see what comes of our efforts to screen eaves in a small village just west of the airport in Kisumu, on the shores of Lake Victoria.</p><p>It seems to me an open question whether by focusing on a small discrete geographical area, one can bring about permanent, or at least long-lasting change.</p><p>--Cliff</p>
William Jobin
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I would certainly screen my own house to protect my family
Dear Cliff, Congratulations for starting a project on screening in Kisumu. You ask whether a small project would be sufficient. It depends on your goal. If you want to protect you and your family, that is a very important step. But if you want to demonstrate cost-effectiveness of screens, you need to add a few things besides replicates. For instance you would want to compare a group of screened houses with a group of bednet houses with a group of sprayed houses. Then, with sufficient replicates - at least 3 - you could do a cost/effectiveness comparison. Three is a magic number because you can do statistics on the results - mean and standard deviations. That allows you to evaluate how significant are any differences. For instance if your family has 12% prevalence and the other houses have 15% prevalence, is that significant or just random variations? The reason you need comparison areas is that external factors might influence your house, such as a drought, heavy rains, change in mosquito species, etc. Such external factors always seem to occur, despite our best intentions. For instance we sprayed 100,000 houses in Southern Angola in 2005 and found no malaria afterwards. But when we compared them to houses we had not sprayed, in a nearby and similar municipality, there was no malaria there either, because of a deep drought. With replicates and comparison areas, you also usually want before and after evaluations, meaning a few years before and a few years after you install the screens. Trends can be important in evaluating too. If malaria is generally disappearing from the area, your intervention might not matter much. But if there is a surge, and you put a stop to it with your screens, then you know you did right. Soon you will become a scientist. Since you are in Manhattan, come join our next brown-bag luncheon (bring your own) of our African Malaria Coalition. About a dozen of us will meet this quarter on 10 August at the Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd at 236 E. 31st St at noon. We supply tea and coffee, and there is no charge, just send me an email if you are coming. Our group includes students and faculty from several Eastern universities, from Boston University to Johns Hopkins. Very informal discussions among friends. All are welcome. Call me at 1 970 560 1182 if you have questions.

William Jobin Director of Blue Nile Associates

Joseh Nale (not verified)
Malaria In West New Briatin, Papua New Guinea.
Hi Cliff, I new to this but am not new to Malaria. I graduated with an MBBS back in 2001 and worked in a public hospital for 4 years. I then joined the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research (PNGIMR) briefly for 2 years before returning to join another hospital. This time,more involvement in public health. I moved into Administration (Advisor for Health in my Province) ad a recently appointed the Acting CEO of my provincial hospital (Kimbe General Hospital, West New Britain Province). Im briefly telling yuo all this information because it is important that you have a clear picture of our situation here in my province. The statitics on morbidity and mortality relating to malaria is quite diplorable, amidst the efforts the National Government is putting into the malaria control programs. There is introdution of the use of Mala 1 now as the Nationally approved treatment protocol. Unfortunately, there is still widespread use of old regimes for reasons of unavailability of new regime (Mala 1) complicated further by the ready availability of this done-away regimes over the counter. The National Government, in collaboration wth our donor partners, did a nation wide campaign towards this effort. This included mass distribution of mosquitoe nets. These did some influence to the overall health indicators but only for a short while. Our situation is complex but the fact that more than 80% of our population lives in the rural most areas of the country/province, with poor access to basic government services, and the huge disparity in emphasis on urban development relative to rural makes the situation far from over. Our situation in the 20 provinces is different. The over 600 cultures and languages makes it more difficult. Our suggestion is to deal with provinces individually but the national wants to deliver a standard program in all the provinces which makes sense considering where the funding suport is coming from. If there are vissionares out there who wants to Mke a difference, we in the heath sector in West New Britain Province are looking for partners to help us effectively control our malaria situation and improve the indicators we have as province. Please help us. We will provide further details if anyone is willing to progress this.
Areej Al-khalaf
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I am happy to Jouint with you
I am happy to Jouint with you in Malaria World, I am intersting in the studies of Mosquito. The Title of my PhD is Biological and Histopathological Studies on Some Plant Extracts Against Culex quinquefasciatus in Saudi Arabia. It showed The efficacy of pesticide (extracted from plants) affecting mosquito larvae led to utilize various kinds of plants to control mosquitoes in various parts of the world. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is distinguished of it desert environment including various kinds of plants to be utilized in extracting effective materials as pesticides that do not affect nontargeted man, animal and environment. Three plants were selected to extract materials or components from to deal with (Culicidae) (Culex quinquefasciatus); they are: Artemisia herba alba, Matricaraia chamomilla and Melia azedarach. The methanol extract effectiveness of each tested plant has been identified in the present study alone. Treated the 3rd larval instar of Cx. quienqufasciatus using different concentrations of these extracts for periods of 24 hours and 48 hours. We studied the Possibility of deposited egg (Repellent effect) on treated surface with different concentrations of plant extracts, Possibility of female biting from treated skin with LC50, The encubation period and possibility of hatching after transfer it to treated surface with LC50 – LC95, Latent effect on some biological aspects of treated larvae,The effect of some environmental factors on the 3rd larval instar of Cx. quinquefasiatus treated with LC50 of A. herba alba, M. chamomilla and M. azedarach extracts, Histological studies on the alimentary canal of the Cx. quinquefasciatus of the 3rd larval instar depending on the optical (light) microscope and Electron microscope and the Histophathological study of the internal canal of Cx. quinquefasiatus when it is the 3rd larval instar larvae treated with herbal extracts: A. herba alba, M. chamomilla and M. azedarach through optical microscope.
Sumodan P K
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Papers
Have you published your findings?

Dr. P.K. Sumodan

Assistant Professor of Zoology

Government College Madappally,

Kerala, India

TABUE raymond (not verified)
Introduce myself
I come now to discover your website and I am very happy to have professionals with whom I can share in entomology. Currently at The Laboratory of Integrated Management Of The National Program of Fight against Malaria in Cameroon, I have an International Masters in Medical and Veterinary Entomology from the University of Montpellier II (France) & the University of Abomey (Benin) I am currently looking for a PhD scholarship.
Graham Small
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Current research in malaria vector control
Hi, my name is Graham Small. I have a PhD from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and postdoctoral research experience at Cardiff University in pesticide resistance. I have over 25 years experience in resistance diagnosis, characterisation and monitoring. I am currently Technical Director at i2LResearch Ltd, a GLP and GEP certified contract research company providing product development, product testing and consultancy services to the pest control industry worldwide. I've joined MalariaWorld to help keep myself up to date with current research in mosquito vector control and to engage in discussions on where mosquito vector control (in particular insecticide resistance management) is headed.
Sumodan P K
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Mosquito Researcher from India
<P>I am an Assistant Professor of Zoology in Kerala, India. I started my career as a researcher at Malaria Research Centre, Goa. I was there for almost&nbsp; a decade. Then I moved back to my home state Kerala in 2001. For two years I had served as a District Malaria Officer and&nbsp; in 2003 joined the present position. My areas of research are mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases. Since Kerala is almost free of indigenous malaria I had shifted my interest to Dengue, Chikungunya, Japanese Encephalitis and Lymphatic Filariasis.&nbsp;Recently, I have come back to malaria, as sporadic cases of the disease&nbsp;have started appearing in my home town and I have also discovered that the notorious vector <EM>Anopheles stephensi </EM>is very much prevalent in my town.</P> <P>I have published 21 research papers and one book entitled "Mosquito-breeding in the Rubber plantations of Kerala, India: A study based on Ecosystem Approach". Besides, I am also a popular science writer and text book writer. I have published 12 popular science articles in English and one book entitled "Living Technolgies: Imitating Life". I have also authored/co-authored 8 text books for Undergraduate studentsof Zoology and Engineering.</P> <P>In 2011 I was invited by Institute of Research and Development for an invited talk on 'Rubber plantations and Mosquito-borne Diseases: An Experience from Kerala, India' during the symposium on Social and Ecological Dimensions of Infectious Diseases held at Mahidhol University, Thailand. I look forward for such international experiences through Malaria World.</P>

Dr. P.K. Sumodan

Assistant Professor of Zoology

Government College Madappally,

Kerala, India

sonam vijay
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Me and Malaria
<p>Hello everyone,</p><p>I am Ms Sonam Vijay, a Ph.D student from National Institute of Malaria Research, New Delhi, India. My research mainly focus on mosquito innate immunity.</p><p>With best regards</p><p>Sonam Vijay</p><p>Senior Research Fellow &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
Michael Shankol... (not verified)
Biochemistry of Malaria/Molecular Biology
<p>A biochemist/lecturer and associate dean, Faculty of Natural &nbsp;and Applied Sciences. St John's Universit of Tanzania</p>
Natasha Laban
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Me, Myself and Plasmodium
Hello Everyone! My name is Natasha and i have a BSc in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry. I have been working as a Laboratory Scientist in a Malaria Research lab for 7 months now particularly PCR detection of Plasmodium parasite and gametocyte under an epidemiological study in my country Zambia. I am really interested in and looking forward to gaining and sharing knowledge and ideas with you all :)
Partho Dhang (not verified)
Vector borne Diseases
Hi all I am a Pest Management Professional presently living in Philippines. While majority debate on malaria control either by killing the mosquito pest or developing vaccination methods to answer a cure, I believe in educating the public in preventing a bite as the foremost. Most visible acts in Malaria control is commercially driven, benefiting pharmaceuticals, insecticide and sprayer manufacturers. The work of Vector borne disease prevention is a federal act. The responsible governments should use all its power and control over mass media to inform public to avoid a bite. Personal protection by being aware and on guard could be more sustainable. The process of natural selection will answer the rest ! Regards Partho
Edy Nacarapa
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Interrested to do Tropical Medicine
<p>I'm earlier physician , an recente General Practice, I live at tropical country where the endemic disease such as Malaria are common, and predominante, During my School at Catholic University of Mozambique, an teacher of me, invited me to participate an inquery obout Malaria to do do cross-section between Malaria, HIV, TB in patient taking Cotrimoxazol medication, and TARV. I did this studied and i liked, Now, im very comprommissed to do more studied about this phenemonem. Malaria is Big problem in poor-countries where are poor ways of sanitation, and poor control of vector I'm Mozambican, Medical Doctor, interrested to do Tropical Medicine </p>

Edy Nacarapa

Malaria Expert Seeking Jobs
I am seeking opportunities to utilize a skill set that combines both public policy and science. I will be receiving my PhD in Global Infectious Diseases (GID) from Georgetown University. Georgetown’s GID program is specifically designed to integrate scientific knowledge and public policy. My technical training, under Dr. Paul Roepe, and knowledge of how to effectively translate science into polices that save lives are invaluable. Please help me find an employer that would allow me to best utilize my dual degree.
William Jobin
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Global fight against malaria involves science and public policy
Dear Nicholas Baro, Congratulations on your studies at Georgetown. Those of us in the fight against malaria look forward to your contributions, which I am sure will be invaluable. A group of us on the East Coast of US - the African Malaria Coalition - have informal luncheon meetings on a quarterly basis in Manhattan, and I invite you to join us for broad discussions on malaria control in Africa, where the biggest challenge is. Getting acquainted with our group should give you some idea of the possibilities for your career, as most of us have had experience fighting malaria in Africa. We are meeting next week on Wednesday 10 October at noon for a few hours. If you check the Amtrak schedules, you will see that you can get a train from Washington which will arrive Penn Station just in time for you to walk East a few blocks and join us at noon. We have "brown bag" luncheons where you bring your own lunch, but we supply tea and coffee. Our group includes faculty and students from several universities, including Johns Hopkins, Yale, Columbia, MIT and Boston University, so your presence from Georgetown would be more than welcomed. This Wednesday we will be discussing the relation of malaria to agriculture in Ethiopia, and also ways to improve the US Presidential Malaria Initiative for Africa, which is the largest program fighting malaria in Africa. We meet at 236 E 31st St, about a 20 minute walk East from Penn Station. If you confirm that you can join us, we won't start until you get there. My fone is 1 970 560 1182. My direct email address is blue.nile@earthlink.net. Bill Jobin, the Coordinaor for AMC.

William Jobin Director of Blue Nile Associates

Fwaya Mike (not verified)
Malaria Parasitology
I am an Msc Parasitology & Vector Biology Student at Maseno University with deep Interest in Malaria Immunogenetics. I believe this is where real encounter is in the line of Development of Vaccination. Being in this Malaria Research Community is a Wonderful Experience that I know will Raise my Understanding of Malaria Through Interaction with who is who in the world of Malariology... Thanks Fwaya
Larry KIMANI
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Chemotherapy of malaria
My name is Larry, I am a pharmacist practising in Nairobi and my main research interests include chemotherapy of malaria and development of resistance amongst the plasmodium species
Olajoju Soniran
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PhD Student working on drug resistant malaria parasites
Hi everyone, I am a PhD student in Nigeria working on malaria. I had my first degree in Zoology (B.Sc)in the year 2005 and my second degree (M.Sc Parasitology) in the year 2010. I researched on mosquitoes during my B.Sc, antiplasmodial properties of a plant during my MSc, and currently interested in epidemiological studies on drug resistant genes and variations within the human populace using documented molecular biomarkers. I also hope to identify more molecular genes that can be used in detecting parasite resistance especially to ACT drugs. I am interested in drug resistance since it is one of the major obstacles thwarting effective malaria control programmes over the past decades. I had co-authored a research on trypanosomiasis two (2) years ago due to the fact that i enjoy collaborative studies and very much interested in learning. I look forward to share my knowledge and findings with malaria scientists in the future.
Daniel Bridges
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Molecular biologist
I am a postdoc molecular biologist / biochemist. Started out as an undergrad looking at TB, then got interested in parasitology. Completed my PhD looking at drug resistance mechanisms in trypanosomes before moving into malaria. Have worked on some aspects of malaria drug resistance as well as molecular events around development of cerebral malaria. Am now based in Lusaka, Zambia where I work on various malaria interventions, namely improving surveillance mechanisms and reporting of cases with a view to identifying and targeting hotspots of transmission. Am also working on trying to use genetics to understand transmission dynamics in low transmission settings....
Edem Edem (not verified)
My introduction
Hello members, I am excited to see you all on this forum, I think we can learn a great deal from each other. I live and work in Nigeria. Presently I work with Christian Aid Nigeria country program. I am their Malaria focal person. We have distributed close to a million LLINs in 4 state and in April, 2013 we are starting our Malaria pilot in Anambra state.
Katy French
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Hello from Washington!
Greetings all, I am delighted to have found this great community. I work for MosquitoZone International and we provide integrated vector control (as well as supportive services and products) for private and public sector clients, both on the worksite and in the community. We have worked on most continents and pride ourselves on science-driven, entomologically and epidemiologically sound programs. We are based in Houston, TX, USA, but I run the Washington, DC office. Prior to coming to MZI in 2013, I served 10 years as a Congressional oversight investigator and legislative advisor to four U.S. Senators and three Committees with jurisdiction over global health. I was the lead staffer for the 2003-2005 oversight that led to malaria-related reforms (specifically, changing policies to start supporting ACT use and IRS) at the Global Fund, the WHO and the creation of the President's Malaria Initiative. I also was a lead staffer in the 2003 creation and 2008 reauthorization of PEPFAR. Prior to my work on Capitol Hill, I was the program evaluator for Whitman-Walker Clinic, a large HIV/AIDS service organization in the DC area, and a research instructor at Georgetown University School of Medicine. I received an ScM in infectious disease epidemiology from Harvard SPH and a BA in sociology from University of Virginia. I hope to make the acquaintance of many of you. We are always recruiting for field entomologists and operational folks, as well as looking for partners in our work.

Katy French
VP Corporate Affairs
MosquitoZone International
Fight malaria. Protect people and productivity.
1101 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington, DC 20004

William Jobin
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Your advice on Washington
Hi Katy, Thanks for joining us. It sounds like your experience should be valuable for everybody in the malaria fight. A fairly broad-based group of us, some with as much as 50 years of experience in Africa are trying to expand and improve the Presidential Malaria Initiative, as well as other US efforts to support the attack on malaria in Africa. We have tried personal visits, are writing an OpEd piece for World Malaria Day, send many letters and emails. But we notice little response or effect. Do you have any advice for us? How can we connect with the important folks. That would include Tim ziemer, head of PMI, and some of the congressional bipartisan malaria caucasses. Bill Jobin Coordinator of African Malaria Dialogues

William Jobin Director of Blue Nile Associates

Alan Yap
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Just joined!
Hi everyone! I have just signed up as a member of the MalariaWorld so I thought I should leave a comment. I am a PhD student at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, currently in my third year under the supervision of Prof Alan Cowman. My main project is to set up a robust conditional gene regulation system to regulate gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum parasites. This is important because development of an efficient gene regulation system, which is grossly inadequate at the moment, will allow us to dissect the role of genes essential for parasite survival. Currently, knocking out genes which are required in the blood stage life cycle of the parasite results in lethality therefore forestalling any functional analyses on the genes. Conditional gene regulations has allowed for a more precise annotation of the functions of genes previously thought to be only as being essential for survival.
Ingeborg van Schayk
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Welcome
Dear Alan, thank you for joining. Looking forward to be reading your views and comments.
Jeff Juel
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Civil Engineer with expertise in flood control and drainage
I am a Civil Engineer with a BSCE and 25 years of engineering experience. I have unusual expertise in flood control including water control devices known as tide gates and flap gates. Drainage systems utilizing tide gates have interesting applications for vector control. After a good rain, a levee without at least one culvert will enclose a shallow and growing lake. During a flood or when there is a high tide outboard of the levee, backflow through a culvert without a flap gate would gradually fill the lower elevations of the land protected by the levee. Flap gates are very simple mechanical valves used with drainage culverts. They prevent backflow and they are used with culverts to pass water through levees. If the water level outboard of the levee experiences tidal variations, the culvert and flap gate are referred to as a “tide gate”. Tide gates are closed during high tides and they open – at times – during low tides. They only open when water has accumulated and when this water can drain by gravity. During dry periods, when the tide gates are closed, any water in the ditches upstream from the tide gate is stagnant. Most people, including most engineers, do not know what a tide gate is. They are so simple that engineers are usually not needed for tide gate projects. Diking and drainage districts and local governments are the entities that deal with flap gates and tide gates. I have a design for a tide gate that allows a modest amount of tidal exchange without allowing flooding. The water on the protected side of the levee rises and falls with the tide, but the high water level is the same from one day to the next – a monotonous high tide. The ebbing and flooding flow interrupts what would otherwise be stagnant water. This improves drainage, which should reduce mosquito breeding opportunities. I believe that it is possible that this device could seduce female mosquitoes into laying their eggs on or near water that has no chance of allowing the larvae to mature into adults. The eggs and larvae would be effectively diluted to oblivion by water filling and draining the ditches with the tides. I have posted a detailed document describing vector control and tide gates at http://issuu.com/jueltidegates/docs/a_new_weapon_in_the_war_against_malaria_or_an_insi?mode=window&viewMode=doublePage This document describes how this could be helpful for vector control. My hope is that the people in this organization will consider my document and offer comments and suggestions – or simply explain why this is impractical. I also have a website with my resume and other information – www.jueltide.com

Jeff Juel, PE
www.jueltide.com

Edem (not verified)
Request for Malaria Prevention and Control Education Manual/guid
Dear All, I am a staff at Christian Aid, Nigeria Country Programme, currently support the Malaria Programme with local partners. I want to use this forum to solicit for any Malaria Prevention/Control Education Manual or Guide that is simple to be use by community volunteers in conducting malaria Prevention and control education. Also, to solicit for any funding opportunity for Malaria programme for Nigeria that we can tap into or apply. Kindly forward available information to me at the below address, also kindly share this request among your colleagues and other people in your next work. I look forward to your support. Thanks Edem Okon Edem Programme Officer - Malaria Programme Christian Aid (UK), Nigeria Country Programme Asokoro, Abuja Nigeria Email: eoedem4o@gmail.com
Monika Gulia-Nuss (not verified)
Introduction
Hi All, I am a vector biologist. I've been studying mosquitoes since 1998. My Master's project on novel adulticide based on plant extracts sparked my interest in mosquito system. Since then, I have worked on several different aspects of mosquito biology and parasite transmission. Growing up in India, Malaria has been just part of life.
Mark Featherstone
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Hello from Singapore
Hi all, I'm a basic scientist generally interested in the control of gene expression in eukaryotes. I have recently turned my attention to P falciparum. Hope to meet more colleagues in the field over the coming months and years. Regards, Mark

Mark Featherstone
School of Biological Sciences
Nanyang Technological University
Singapore

Andy Graham
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Andy L. Graham American in Kara, Togo
Hello, I am Andy Lee Graham a person who has perpetually traveled for over 16 years and visited 90 countries as a travel writers. I am semi-retiring in Kara, Togo and will eradicate malaria in the city, a small well defined area. Soon, we will start a anti-malaria store, that will sell all the necessary supplies to fight malaria, and the mosquitoes that carry the parasite. Window screens, door screens, bed nets, citronelle, rapid test malaria, larvacides, etc. Generally, we believe there is a need to partner with the people, the city, and business to create a behavioral change. I am looking for simple products to sell at cost, or below cost to locals. Thanks

Thank you, Andy Graham working on eradication of malaria in Kara, Togo West Africa. Togo Cell: +228 9294 0714 Benin Cell: +229 9559 6685 USA Skype: hobotraveler.com

Mike Ncube
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Mike Ncube - Introductions
Hi there - my name is Mike Ncube. I do field work in Malaria control. Currently working for International SOS in Papua New Guinea on a remote project site with more than 10,000 non immune foreign workers at a known malaria transmission area. I am happy to join other people working in malaria control in other parts of the world. I am looking forward to sharing and learning. Good day everyone

Mike Ncube

Christopher Weir
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Introducing myself
Hi, my name is Christopher and I am doing a joint Ph.D at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and the University of Edinburgh, in the Cowman and Barlow groups respectively. My thesis topic is the atomic resolution dissection of the interaction between key malaria parasite proteins and erythrocyte receptors. I consider a structural biology-focused approach to rational vaccine design is imperative and I hope to elucidate relevant information to contribute to the wider community. I am also very passionate about communicating science to the public and write for Mostly Science.com about topics spanning from parasites, the philosophy of science and pseudoscience.

Christopher N Weir BSc(BioMed), MMolBiol.
Ph.D student (Cowman lab)
Division of Infection and Immunity
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
Website: http://www.wehi.edu.au/

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