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CRISPR

Gene-drive suppression of mosquito populations in large cages as a bridge between lab and field

August 3, 2021 - 17:29 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Hammond A, Pollegioni P, Persampieri T, North A, Minuz R, Trusso A, Bucci A, Kyrou K, Morianou I, Simoni A, Nolan T, Müller R, Crisanti A
Reference: 
Nat Commun. 2021 Jul 28;12(1):4589

CRISPR-based gene-drives targeting the gene doublesex in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae effectively suppressed the reproductive capability of mosquito populations reared in small laboratory cages. To bridge the gap between laboratory and the field, this gene-drive technology must be challenged with vector ecology.Here we report the suppressive activity of the gene-drive in age-structured An. gambiae populations in large indoor cages that permit complex feeding and reproductive behaviours.

Analysis of off-target effects in CRISPR-based gene drives in the human malaria mosquito

June 1, 2021 - 12:29 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Garrood WT, Kranjc N, Petri K, Kim DY, Guo JA, Hammond AM, Morianou I, Pattanayak V, Joung JK, Crisanti A, Simoni A
Reference: 
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2021 Jun 1;118(22):e2004838117

CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease-based gene drives have been developed toward the aim of control of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae Gene drives are based on an active source of Cas9 nuclease in the germline that promotes super-Mendelian inheritance of the transgene by homology-directed repair ("homing"). Understanding whether CRISPR-induced off-target mutations are generated in Anopheles mosquitoes is an important aspect of risk assessment before any potential field release of this technology.

Optimized CRISPR tools and site-directed transgenesis towards gene drive development in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes

May 25, 2021 - 14:19 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Feng X, López Del Amo V, Mameli E, Lee M, Bishop AL, Perrimon N, Gantz VM
Reference: 
Nat Commun. 2021 May 20;12(1):2960

Culex mosquitoes are a global vector for multiple human and animal diseases, including West Nile virus, lymphatic filariasis, and avian malaria, posing a constant threat to public health, livestock, companion animals, and endangered birds. While rising insecticide resistance has threatened the control of Culex mosquitoes, advances in CRISPR genome-editing tools have fostered the development of alternative genetic strategies such as gene drive systems to fight disease vectors.

Control of malaria-transmitting mosquitoes using gene drives

December 30, 2020 - 13:35 -- Open Access
Author(s): 
Nolan T
Reference: 
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2021 Feb 15;376(1818):20190803

Gene drives are selfish genetic elements that can be re-designed to invade a population and they hold tremendous potential for the control of mosquitoes that transmit disease. Much progress has been made recently in demonstrating proof of principle for gene drives able to suppress populations of malarial mosquitoes, or to make them refractory to the Plasmodium parasites they transmit.

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